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Anthropology

The biological, social, and cultural development of humankind, with emphasis upon human evolution and race formation, and the major social, economic, political, religious, technological, and linguistic systems.

Not finished yet

I'm still working on this Research Guide.
More soon. :-)
~Donna

Any suggestions, comments, etc. are welcome - and encouraged.


 

What is Anthropology?
Anthropology is the study of what makes us human. Anthropologists take a broad approach to understanding the many different aspects of the human experience, which we call holism. They consider the past, through archaeology, to see how human groups lived hundreds or thousands of years ago and what was important to them. They consider what makes up our biological bodies and genetics, as well as our bones, diet, and health. Anthropologists also compare humans with other animals (most often, other primates like monkeys and chimpanzees) to see what we have in common with them and what makes us unique. Even though nearly all humans need the same things to survive, like food, water, and companionship, the ways people meet these needs can be very different. For example, everyone needs to eat, but people eat different foods and get food in different ways. So anthropologists look at how different groups of people get food, prepare it, and share it. World hunger is not a problem of production but social barriers to distribution, and that Amartya Sen won a Nobel Prize for showing this was the case for all of the 20th century’s famines. Anthropologists also try to understand how people interact in social relationships (for example with families and friends). They look at the different ways people dress and communicate in different societies. Anthropologists sometimes use these comparisons to understand their own society. Many anthropologists work in their own societies looking at economics, health, education, law, and policy (to name just a few topics). When trying to understand these complex issues, they keep in mind what they know about biology, culture, types of communication, and how humans lived in the past.
(from What is Anthropology? (c. 2020). https://www.americananthro.org/AdvanceYourCareer/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2150.)

VAWLT and Writing Centers

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The UMA Writing Centers and the VAWLT (Virtual, Accessibility, Writing, Library & Technology tutors)
offer UMA students free, online tutoring sessions. Just visit their websites to learn more.

All writing help will be virtual this semester, Fall 2020.

UMA Writing Center in Augusta

UMA Writing Center in Bangor