ENG 101 - College Writing

Greetings, College Writers!

I am looking forward to working with you in this course and, hopefully, throughout your college career - and beyond. :-)

~Donna
donna.maher@maine.edu

Today's plan

Activity 1: Writing as a tool to heal trauma

  1. Google: Writing as a tool to heal trauma
    • How many resources did you find?
    • What types?
    • Who are the responsible parties?
    • Do you think you found an answer? Or a source that can help?
  2. OneSearch: Writing as a tool to heal trauma
    • Put in the all the words
    • How many resources did you find? 11
    • What types?
    • “Quick Look”
    • Do you think you found an answer? Or a source that can help?
  3. OneSearch: select the important words: writing trauma heal
    • How many resources did you find? 163
    • What types?
    • “Quick Look”
    • Do you think you found an answer? Or a source that can help?
    • What types of sources did you find?
      1. Books/eBooks
      2. Newspaper articles
      3. Journal articles
  4. OneSearch: select the important words: writing trauma heal* See Infographics to the left.
    • How many resources did you find? 3,073 / 163
    • What types?
    • “Quick Look”
    • Do you think you found an answer? Or a source that can help?
    • What types of sources did you find?
  5. #2 from keywords

    Glass, O., Dreusicke, M., Evans, J., Bechard, E., & Wolever, R. Q. (2019). Expressive writing to improve resilience to trauma: A clinical feasibility trial. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 34, 240-246. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.12.005

    •  Subject terms: 
      1. Therapeutic writing
      2. Trauma
      3. Traumatic life events
      4. Wounds and Injuries - psychology
      5. Wounds and Injuries - therapy
      6. Writing
    • Any different source types than from above?
      1. Newsletter?
      2. Dissertation/thesis
      3. Book review
  6. Purpose???
  7. What are some ways to refine and/or narrow your search?

 

Activity 2: Independent research time

What is something that might be important to you? For example:

If your child is diagnosed with ADHD, where would you look and what do you want to know?

  • What types of information might answer your questions?
  • What probably will not help?
  • Do you know what the information might or should look like?
  1. Try using OneSearch. Only the important words.
  2. Narrow your search by selecting one (1) content type.
    • For example, try Reference.
    • Did you find anything?
      • If yes, have you found enough? If yes, I guess you are finished. :-)
      • If not, what might be another way to narrow or limit your search?
  3. Do you think you might have better luck with Google?
  4. Whether using Google, Google Scholar, or a library database, keep these suggestions in mind.
    Evaluating your sources

Don’t hesitate to ask questions! We can help.

Types of information

  • Books and encyclopedias
  • Websites, web pages, and blogs
  • Magazine, journal, and newspaper articles
  • Research reports and conference papers
  • Field notes and diaries
  • Photographs, paintings, cartoons, and other artworks
  • TV and radio programs, podcasts, movies, and videos
  • Illuminated manuscripts and artifacts
  • Bones, minerals, and fossils
  • Preserved tissues and organs
  • Architectural plans and maps
  • Pamphlets and government documents
  • Music scores and recorded performances
  • Dance notation and theater set models

Fiction

Non-fiction

Databases

Generally, when referring to databases, especially academic (college and university) library databases, we are referring to Scholarly resources. Specifically Scholarly & Peer-Reviewed articles.

Each database contains a collection of information about articles (in this case). The database could contain a broad selection of subjects or disciplines, such as Academic Search Complete. Others contain specific information, such as Agricola. 

Check out our A to Z list of Databases to see the many different types. You will see video databases, reference resources, as well as other types of information.

Two of my favorite databases are:

Information Timeline Graphic by adstarkel. Used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Accessibility Statement
The University provides reasonable accommodations to individuals with disabilities upon request. Any person with a disability who needs accommodations for a workshop should contact UMA Libraries at uma.library@maine.edu to submit a request. Due to the lead-time needed to arrange certain accommodations, individuals should submit their request no later 1 week before the event.